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Planetary Approach and Retreat - 07.10.04


As planets move in time they stimulate high and low pressure impulses on earth. This article describes how to read these motions in weather patterns.


Fig.1


Fig.1

In the actual practice of forming a forecast with the planetary flux model there appears to be a wave-like rhythmical pattern of high and low pressure values registered on an eclipse point; first, as a planet approaches, then as the planet conjuncts the point, and then as the planet moves away from the eclipse point. These values generate responses on what Doc Weather calls jet curves;jet curves . The forces on the jet curves then interact with the dominant climatic regime over which they pass. As planets move towards and away from the points it appears that there is a kind of Doppler wave of influences that gives the 45° and 72° jet curves linked to the point a fluctuating character during the times of planetary approach, conjunction and retreat in the vicinity of eclipse points. In figure 1 this wave like high and low-pressure fluctuation is depicted as a wave of oscillating high pressure and low- pressure values. The numbers represent the angular aspect in degrees of arc that a planet moves through while it is approaching a conjunction with another planet or an eclipse point. Most often in Doc Weather a 10° angle of arc refers to the position of a planet when it is ten degrees away from a conjunction with an eclipse point.

It can be seen from figure 1 that a planet approaching an eclipse point from 10° to 6° would stimulate predominantly low- pressure values. The same planet continuing it's approach would generate high- pressure values as it passes from 5° to conjunction at 0° where a strong low would be generated in the time frame of the conjunction. On the other side of the conjunction the high pressure values would be dominant for the retreat from 1° to 5° and the low pressure values would be dominant in the retreat transit from 5° to 10°.


Fig.2


Fig.2

A planet moving through the low-pressure section of the Doppler curve would engender a low- pressure response on the 45° and 72° jet curves projected from that eclipse point. (fig 2) Low-pressure values tend to create troughs on both the 45° and 72° jet curves. In contrast to this, high-pressure values on the eclipse point tend to create blocks on both the 45°and 72° jet curves. As a planet passes the 9° aspect it runs through a series of angular aspects that have proved to stimulate low- pressure values on the jet curves. The same jet curves will tend to register high-pressure when the planet continues into the high pressure side of the curve moving from 5° to 1°. The jet curves associated with these points manifest ridge formation, and trough formation in time frames that are coincident with the approach, conjunction and retreat of the transiting planet.


Fig.3


Fig.3

This creates a strong dynamical pattern for the approach and retreat of planets near to the two eclipse points in both the eastern pair of eclipse points and in the western pair of eclipse points. This same dynamic is present as a planet approaches a point that is 90° of arc from each eclipse point. In the bottom center of (figure 3) the pair of polar 90° points is illustrated. The dynamic difference between a polar 90° point and an eclipse point is that a planet approaching an eclipse point registers its values mainly on the 45° and 72° jet curves in longitudes that are far to the east and west of the point. A planet approaching a polar 90° point registers its values at a high latitude (dark circle) in the same longitude of the polar 90° point.


Fig.4


Fig.4

In (figure 4) there can be seen projecting out of the two eclipse points, a double set of 72° jet curves from each eclipse point. These curves cross each other in the longitude of the 90°lines that project from each polar 90° point on the equator. The polar 90° lines run north and south from the polar 90° points to the poles. Being the center of so much geometric focus, this nexus of 72° and 90° lines often makes it the dominant weather maker in a given chart especially if this are is placed over a sensitive climate zone.

However, in a given year it may be that the 45° jet curves are over a particularly sensitive climate area. Then, planetary motion events near to the eclipse points would most likely manifest on the 45° jet curves. In a third option, in some years the eclipse lines that run due north from the 90° points themselves and extend to the north pole are the focus of the major weather making events. This happens when a slow moving planet is caught between the polar 90° points (see fig 3) themselves and runs through the high and low-pressure approach and retreat cycle between the two points. This makes for a very dynamic upper latitude center.


Fig.5


Fig.5

In a final pattern, (figure 5) the eclipse lines that project 180° from each eclipse point to a position opposite in longitude, also register their influences at a high-latitude in what climatologists call the polar front.The polar front is the region where the polar air masses collide with the air masses of the temperate zone. There is strong turbulence and potential for forming vortices (vortexial potential) in the polar front area. In years when the area between the eclipse lines is the site of strong planetary motion they can be the dominant high-latitude element in the chart, especially if the high-latitude area covered by the two eclipse lines is situated in a climatically sensitive area like Hudson Bay or Greenland or over Vancouver Island in British Columbia. In such years the high-latitude areas dominate the climate patterns. If the eclipse points have no planets in their vicinity or their high latitude zones are not in a particularly sensitive placement (this is the case in figure 5) then the 45° and 72° jet curves projecting from the eclipse grid generally have the most profound effect on the climatic regime in a given year. The 45°and 72° jet curves have a strong effect on the mid-latitudes and can be most effectively used to reckon monsoon influences and the extent of the mixing potentials between the polar front and the tropical front as planetary motions approaching and retreating from the eclipse points exert their influence on mid latitude storm tracks in a given season.